HISTORICAL Overview
OF THE PATTERN FROM REIMS

There is much to share about our featured walking pattern, which originated in Reims, France in the 13th century. This particular design is unique as far as labyrinths go, and we chose it for its interesting aspects and opportunities. It features four arrival harbors “along the way” as well as the center arrival point. The original was featured in the nave of Reims Cathedral (the chief seat for royal coronations) for over 500 years, and was then removed by the clergy at the church.

There are so many different patterns throughout the thousands of years of history, including the first simple patterns drawn in ochre on the walls of caves by our ancestors. In our monthly walks here at Cerimon House - which take place on the third weekend of every month - we add three-dimensional and artful elements to the experience. With the use of props & prompts at each “harbor”, our Creative Path Walk creator and author, Randall Stuart, writes a new theme for the walk each time.

We welcome you to join us at Cerimon House for this in-depth experience, an activity that helps, perhaps, to illuminate the meaning of it all.
For what is the fascination and lure of the labyrinth in human history?
Why does it continue to prove irresistible, and find its way into a modern landscape of revelation and evolution?
How was this particular threshold used in medieval times?
And who were the fascinating medieval architects and masons of Reims, and might we wave to them over the eras,
with admiration for how they created such deep historical significance with their unique labyrinthian geometry?

The Creative Path Walk at Cerimon House strives to illuminate, and embellish upon the idea of this Reims pattern.: by adding a three dimensionality, lights, and soundscape, each themed walk is endowed with a focus that speaks to these times. The journey to the center is an immersive and contemplative activity, and the center awaits.

Reims Cathedral is a sacred space, built (and re-built again) on land that once featured a healing spring, and then Roman baths. The church was the site for coronations of the French royalty.

Reims Cathedral is a sacred space, built (and re-built again) on land that once featured a healing spring, and then Roman baths. The church was the site for coronations of the French royalty.

The Reims labyrinth pattern, once located in the nave of the Gothic Reims Cathedral, is an extremely unique creation and design.
It is the inspiration for our version here at Cerimon House, an adaptation that differs only slightly in size,
and which intrigues and delights the denizens of Portland, Oregon.

The recreation of the Reims labyrinth through projected light. The original was destroyed by the Canons of the church in 1786.

The recreation of the Reims labyrinth through projected light. The original was destroyed by the Canons of the church in 1786.

The drawing that was rendered in a survey before the original labyrinth was destroyed. This depiction includes five (of the many) masons who worked on the pattern for so many years.

The drawing that was rendered in a survey before the original labyrinth was destroyed. This depiction includes five (of the many) masons who worked on the pattern for so many years.